Percutaneous Transvenous Coil Embolization Treatment for Liver Shunts

Update: This procedure is now available at several locations around the country.

Last year, we published a post on a promising new procedure, Percutaneous Transvenous Coil Embolization (PTCE) for the repair of liver shunts. The first scientific paper has come out on this procedure, but Dr. Cassie Lux, Assistant Professor of Surgery at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tennessee, very generously wrote up for us how the procedure works: Read more

Anesthesia Sensitivity Study Update

Last year, we assisted Dr. Michael Court of Washington State University Vet School on a study he was doing with sighthound anesthesia sensitivities. You can read more about his study here.

We have provided Dr. Court with enough samples for his initial study, but he is still interested in receiving cheek swab samples from dogs that have experienced slow/rough anesthetic recovery following an injectable anesthetic. Read more

Photo of Deerhound puppies taken by Miranda Levin

by John Dillberger, DVM

Reprinted from the September/October 2014 Claymore

In 2011 I wrote about research underway at Ohio State University (OSU) to investigate the cause of excessive post-operative bleeding that occurred in many Greyhounds one or two days after surgery.  Evidence suggested that affected dogs formed normal blood clots, but that the clots dissolved too quickly.  Acting on a hunch from Dr. Couto, veterinarians at OSU began using a human drug called epsilon aminocaproic acid (Amicar®) to reduce the risk of bleeding or treat the problem if it occurred.

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Promising New Procedure for Liver (Portosystemic) Shunts

Update: This procedure is now available at several locations around the country, and we have published additional information on it here and here.

Some promising news regarding correcting portosystemic shunts in dogs comes from U.C. Davis, where Dr. Bill Culp has developed a new, non-invasive way to close intrahepatic shunts, which historically have been difficult to correct surgically.

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Reprinted from the January/February 2014 Claymore.

While there haven’t been any earth-shattering discoveries this year, research into the health problems that affect Deerhounds has made some slow and steady progress on several fronts. There are also a couple of new projects. Read more

Dr. Guillermo Couto, who was spearheading the fibrinolysis research at Ohio State University, has retired, and no one there is continuing this research. Right now, we only suspect that some Deerhounds with bleeding issues have the same problem as Greyhounds, which is suspected to be fibrinolysis. To help us decide what the best next step would be, we thought we would collect some anecdotal information that will help us to determine whether aminocaproic acid helps Deerhounds with post-operative bleeding as it does Greyhounds.

If you have a dog that experiences post-surgical bleeding and the administration of aminocaproic acid stops the bleeding, we would be very interested to hear about that. If you administered aminocaproic acid during a bleeding episode and your dog did not stop bleeding, or your dog starts to bleed even though you were giving your dog aminocaproic acid prophylactically, we would be interested to hear about those experiences, too. As always, your information will be kept confidential. For more information on using aminocaproic acid for post-operative bleeding, go to http://sdcahealth.wordpress.com/health-issues/bleeding-problems/fibrinolysis/.

Please send this information to John Dillberger at P.O. Box 2118, Nashville, IN 47448-2118; (812) 988-6175; or at John “at” Greymorn.com. Please help us to determine whether aminocaproic acid works or not so we know the best next steps to take concerning this problem.